Showing posts with label savory. Show all posts
Showing posts with label savory. Show all posts

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Forbidden Rice Risotto


comfort food.  that's what cold weather is all about...
but with a HEALTHY TWIST

let's just say that this is NOT your typical "risotto".
i would call it "risotto-like"...but it definitely fits the comfort-food category

all the deep rich flavors from the slow cooking and reducing are there, but the black rice has a different texture...almost "al dente-like" to regular rice.  it maintains it's shape no matter how long you cook it.  i cooked this for a good 1 hour and 20 minutes!  the black rice does not act like the Arborio used in classic risotto, but it does make an interesting twist on a popular comfort food dish.  
the end result was delicious and worth the effort, but i think i'll leave the risotto up to the professionals.
on the other hand....
for a fabulous easy recipe using this super-food rice...one on the sweet comfort food list, check out my post on "Black Rice Pudding".  i'm not sure i will make the risotto again (due to the time and effort), but i will surely be making the rice pudding for a healthy dessert alternative or breakfast treat..



Forbidden Rice...once revered for Emperor's only...is now considered one of the new "super-foods".
not only is it full of antioxidants, it is packed with a load of health benefits and more are being discovered.  for more information you might want to click HERE  and  HERE.


FORBIDDEN RICE RISOTTO

1 cup dried forbidden rice
2 1/2 - 3 cup vegetable or chicken broth
NOTE...i ended up using 4 cups homemade broth AND almost 1 can of low sodium broth (see more notes)
1 tbsp butter
1/2 medium shallot chopped fine
1/2 tsp dried thyme
1 big Tbsp shiitake mushroom powder
1/3 cup white wine
1/8 cup grated parmesan cheese
fresh thyme, basil or Italian parsley for topping
8-10 crimini mushrooms, sauteed and browned for additional topping

in a saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat and saute shallots until translucent.  do not brown.  add the forbidden rice and cook for a minute, stirring well so that the rice is well coated with butter and shallots.  deglaze the pan with the white wine and stir to incorporate.  when the wine reduces turn the heat to medium-low and add warm chicken stock...1/2 cup at a time.  add the dried thyme and shiitake mushroom powder.  when 1/2 cup has absorbed, add another...then do this again and again until all stock has been used and risotto looks creamy, done and delicious.  i guess this is "risotto 101".  i have never made risotto, but this is what i was told to do.  i'm sure it takes practice for a perfect risotto.
when you feel it is done, check for seasoning, stir in some grated parmesan and top with fresh thyme, basil OR Italian parsley...and sauteed crimini mushrooms.

A FEW NOTES...if i were to cook this again...i would probably pre-cook the black rice.  then go on with the risotto-like instructions.  i bet it would shorten the overall cooking time, make for a softer bite and it would take less stock.  the recipe called for 2.5 cups of stock and i went through about 5-6 cups of liquid AND it was on the stove for about 1 1/2 hours before it was done..
also when reheating (i had left-overs) just add a little more stock.




Monday, October 1, 2012

Rosemary Vanilla Bean Soda Bread



SODA BREAD...
why is it called "soda" bread when it only has 1 teaspoon of baking soda and a whole tablespoon of baking powder...hmmmm, never mind...

this has to be the easiest bread to make.  i never thought i could make a descent loaf of bread until i tried soda bread.  with a few staple ingredients and a regular loaf pan, you'll have your own moist delicious homemade bread for the week...
OR forget the loaf pan and make it in a big blob on a sheet pan...

VOILA...call it ARTISAN BREAD



i made one a while back titled Sweet Savory Soda Bread, shown above.  it was fabulous...smoked Gouda, sultana raisins and oatmeal made a delicious combo of flavors.  i did the blob on the sheet pan and was amazed for my first time bread experience.  with the crusty outside and a moist soft healthy inside, i knew soda bread was a new favorite.


a perfect surface to slather homemade jams.  the savory rosemary herb pairs well with a dollop of sweet tart plum jam or blackberry vanilla bean.


great for "tea sandwiches" with a little cream cheese, fresh crisp cucumber and some Hawaiian black salt....should have slipped in a nice slice of smoked salmon ?...yummmm

 

ROSEMARY VANILLA BEAN SODA BREAD

2 cups AP flour
1 cup white whole wheat flour
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/3 cup sugar...i used Z sweet
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1 egg, lightly beaten
2 cups buttermilk
i didn't have buttermilk so i did the lemon and whole milk mixture
1/4 cup melted butter
1 big tsp dried rosemary, chopped or minced
NOTE...i like to use fresh rosemary from the garden and dry it in the oven on a low temp...much better than the stuff in the jars.
1 tsp vanilla bean paste.

preheat oven to 325 F.  grease a 9x5 loaf tin

combine flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, dried rosemary and baking soda.  blend egg, vanilla bean paste and buttermilk and add all at once to the flour mixture.  mix until just moistened.  stir in melted butter..  pour into prepared pan.
NOTE...i like to sprinkle a little coarse salt and or some raw sugar on the top before baking.
bake for 65-70 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean.  cool on wire rack,  wrap in tin foil for several hours or overnight for best flavor.

NOTE...i kept mine wrapped in the fridge and sliced as needed.  i find baked goods slice better when chilled.


last little note...i used this for a veal burger and it was fabulous.  the bread is just a little more crumbly than store bought, but the taste far out weighed the use of your typical hamburger bun.

you might try a panini with brie and sliced pear ?...

fagetaboutit


Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Thai Coconut Curry Sauce with Fresh Tofu and Konjac Noodles


healthy fresh tofu and clean Konjac noodles in a light flavorful Spicy Thai Coconut Curry Sauce.

a delicious alternative to a meat and pasta meal.
the sauce is easy and can be made ahead of time.  the tofu...fresh is best if you can find it.  the noodles. however,  are a bit different and unusual.  they are Konjac noodles made from yam flour.  this is a great dish for the non wheat people and those watching the ol' waistline.  a huge serving is under 200 calories and you'll still have room for dessert.  personally, i like it because i eat so many pork products and fatty weird stuff along with my addiction to the Mexican bakery... i have to throw in a healthy light dish every now and then.
the noodles are quite good, but like tofu...pretty flavorless on their own.  they need a good sauce.  i find this coconut curry does just the trick.




fresh tofu (photo above)...way better than packaged....still warm, soft and fragrant like a fresh loaf of bread.  even my mother, a non-tofu lover, said she really liked it....well, maybe that's a stretch.  it only costs about $1.99,  probably twice the size and tastes much better that regular packaged tofu.
i get mine at 99 Ranch Market in Irvine, CA.  if you've never been and you're in Orange County/So. California i highly recommend finding one.  great resource for all Asian goods.

Konjac noodles...aka YAM noodles
a little slippery, very long, no distinct flavor...but a great filler, no wheat, almost no calories, no carbs , fun to eat and a great vehicle for many different sauces.  Konjac noodles come in angel hair and fettuccine cuts as well as blocks and cute little knotted bundles.  check out the nutritional info below...amazingly low on everything.


THAI COCONUT CURRY SAUCE
makes about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups sauce

1/2 medium onion, diced small
1 full Tbsp fresh ginger or, fine dice
1 large clove garlic, fine dice
2 tsp olive oil
1 tsp sesame oil
2 tsp madras curry powder (yellow kind)
1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (more can be added later)
3/4 - 1 cup chicken broth, if canned use low sodium
1 cup coconut milk...i use "lite" coconut milk
1 Tbsp soy sauce
juice from 1 wedge lemon
3" piece of lemon grass...
(smashed then tied together with a string so that it won't come apart and get stringy in the sauce.)
2 tsp lemon zest
4-5 large basil leaves...chiffonade (thin ribbons)
more red chile flakes to sprinkle.

in a medium sauce pan lightly saute onion, garlic and ginger in olive oil and sesame oil until translucent
add chili flakes and curry powder and saute until fragrant...2 minutes 
add tied lemongrass, chicken broth, coconut milk, soy sauce and lemon juice.
bring to a soft boil then to a simmer
simmer and stir a little for about 5 - 10 minutes.
taste for seasoning...a dash more soy?  pepper flakes?
simmer longer if you want it thicker.

if using these Konjac noodles...
noodles must be washed/rinsed well, drained then pat dry as much as possible.
tofu should be drained and slightly pressed to release some of the moisture...then it can be lightly sauteed first in separate pan or just simmered in the sauce.

this is a great sauce to toss with any noodles -YAM NOODLES (shown in photos), shirataki (tofu noodles), udon or even angel hair.
simmer some tofu, fish or chicken in sauce.  if using fish or chicken simmer until cooked through.  then mix with noodles.  i have never cooked the chicken in the sauce...i use already cooked roasted chicken from Costco.
OR just toss with steamed vegetables.
next time i think i'll simmer some talapia in the sauce...oh how i wish i had a sous vide.

NOTE...the sauce freezes well.  it just needs a good stir as it heats through. it will thicken and reduce with stronger flavors.  freeze just the sauce...not the noodles or tofu in the sauce....the noodles get funny after freezing.

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Mushroom Soup with Middle Eastern Flavors


creamy, non dairy, warm, comforting, light, yet filling.
serve as a starter, side or main.  
pureed soups are great for parties or quick family meals because they come together in no time and can always be made ahead.  there's no meat that will get over cooked or veggies that will get mushy.  it reheats well with no separation when non dairy and can be dressed for any occasion.  serve on it's own or dolled up with a little greek yogurt and fresh herbs for the nice presentation.



 a soup like this is so easy to make when you have an immersion blender or a Vitamix.  i lean towards the stick blender when making hot soups.  i don't like to transfer hot liquids from one vessel to another. 

 as you'll see this recipe is fairly elementary...saute the vegetables, add the stock, season well, cook for a little while to combine flavors and puree.

quick note on the dried mushrooms...i always have a big container of dried shitake mushrooms in the pantry.  i find they are always reliable, a bit stronger and they add a nice woodsy flavor to many dishes.  i find them at Costco for a great price.  if you want to use fresh, go ahead...i don't know the quantity...maybe 1/2 - 3/4 lb.?

and GARAM MASALA ?...a wonderful blend of spices mostly associated with Indian food.  it usually includes coriander, chili, cumin,  cinnamon, cloves, mustard, black pepper, nutmeg, cardamom.  here is just one of many  recipes for Garam Masala.  you can make your own, but i buy it for 1.99$...much easier.  garam masala can very greatly from vendor to vendor.  the brand i like best is by SADAF called Garam Masala Seasoning.   i find mine at a great market called Wholesome Choice in Irvine, CA.


MUSHROOM SOUP WITH MIDDLE EASTERN FLAVORS
makes almost 6 cups

1 lb. crimini and white mushrooms, sliced
1 heaping cup (20 Grams) of dried shitake mushrooms
(rehydrate in 1 cup of boiling water)
1/2 onion diced
1 small shallot, diced
3 - 5 cloves ROASTED garlic
2 Tbsp olive oil, separated
1/2 Tbsp butter
3 cups chicken broth.  homemade is best but i only had 2 cups so i had to use 1 cup of canned low sodium
1/2 cup white wine
2 Tbsp Garam Masala
1 tsp salt...more or less to taste
fresh ground pepper

roast a garlic head in 380 F oven for 40 min.
rehydrate dried shitake mushrooms in 1 cup boiling water and let sit.
saute onion and shallot with 1 Tbsp olive oil and 1 tsp salt in stock pot that you will be cooking the soup in until translucent.  you might need to add a splash of stock to this...i was trying to keep the oil at a minimum.
add garam maslala and saute for a couple minutes to wake up the spices   then add 1/2 cup white wine and bring to a boil.  turn off heat and set aside.
saute crimini and white mushrooms in a skillet with 1Tbsp olive oil and a pat of butter until golden brown.  when done set aside some of the best looking slices for garnish.

dice the shitake mushrooms and add with mushroom liquid to the stock pot.
add sauteed mushrooms, roasted garlic, diced shitake and chicken stock to the stock pot.

bring to a boil and simmer for a few minutes.
get your immersion-stick blender out and puree to desired thickness.  i like to puree until smooth creamy texture.  if it's too thick for you, add some more stock and bring back to a quick boil so flavors will meld as one.
check for seasoning.  salt?...pepper?...
ready to serve as is or garnish as you please.

try a little dollop of plain yogurt and your reserved mushroom slices with a sprinkle of parsley or chives.
you could add a touch of heavy cream, but i find it isn't necessary...i try to keep the fat to a minimum and cream seems to make the soup heavy.



Sunday, August 5, 2012

Easy Hock Terrine


what to do with big beautiful UGLY ham hock...?

break it down, tear it apart, smash it in to a loaf tin...

call it charcuterie !...



hi peoples...
sorry, "writers block"...
ha...how apropos.  a block for a block.

maybe that's why i have 23 drafts with photos and recipes waiting for some fabulous intelligent description...hmmm...intelligent just ain't gonna happen.

SO...this is a "WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET" kind of post.
hence, this is more of an idea rather than a recipe.

while shopping at one of my favorite Asian markets, H Mart, i came across a beautiful fresh already cooked ham hock...displayed much like a supermarket might display it's fresh roasted chickens. it was still warm and pliable so i snatched the best looking one up and brought it home.  with a fridge over flowing with food ready to eat i thought what am i gonna do with this big hunk o' hock ?!

i know...i'll make a terrine.

HOW EASY IS THAT !?


of course you can cook your own ham hock and do the same thing, but that takes hours....and ingredients.

ham hocks, much like trotters (aka pig feet) have a lot of good sticky collagen.  this is what makes for good glue in a terrine.  no gelatin needed.

INSTRUCTIONS
all of the following should be done with a warm pliable cooked hock...cool enough to touch and work with.
remove the skin in one piece, if possible.  this makes a nice outer layer and helps hold everything together.  tear apart the meat and tendons.  remove any bones and cartilage.  chunks can be large, but better long and thin instead of fat chunks.  add a little hot water (broth if you have some) maybe start with 1/2 cup to get some of the juices flowing.  SEASONING IS KEY...taste your filling.  maybe add some chopped scallions, chinese five spice, garlic or onion powder, cumin?...salt and pepper!  terrines are something that need extra flavor.
find a vessel that will work well.  i use a small loaf pan.  spray the inside lightly then line with plastic wrap.  leave over hang on all sides.  cut the skin in strips and layer the bottom.  then start packing the goods in...evenly dispersing the meat, fat, tendons and odd bits and pieces.  everything must go in so that it will hold together, but you can discard any unwanted dark ugly veins.
pour what juices you have left over the top and let it sink in.cover with hang over plastic wrap and press down hard with something flat that fits the top of the meat.  you don't want any air pockets.  place in fridge with a weights on top.  your terrine should be ready in a few hours.

voila...you have made a terrine.
pretty enough for any charcuterie platter.
serve chilled, sliced thin.

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

BEST BURGER EVER...Hands down



YES...hands down
THE BEST BURGER I HAVE EVER EATEN

TEN SIMPLE STEPS TO THE BEST BURGER

1.  buy some good rib eye.
2.  grind the meat yourself.
3.  don't pack the patty.
4.  cast iron skillet, searing hot
5.  medium rare is the way to go...
6.  remove from skillet before you think it's done.
7.  rest the meat!
8.  top with Saint Agur cheese while resting
9.  keep additions and condiments to a bare minimum.
10.  enjoy!

now go in for another before they're gone.


start with good rib eye.  look for nice marbling.  fat is a must.  you will be slicing the meat in strips, as shown, and feeding it into the hopper so a big huge plump rib eye is not necessary.
sprinkle the strips with a little onion powder and garlic powder (i prefer powder to salt) before feeding into hopper.


make sure all of your utensils and grinder parts are clean...clean...clean


feed the meat strips through the large hole cutter plate once...then change to the smaller holes and send it through again.  make sure you have a "stomper".  do not push through with your fingers.  ya never know...


when the meat has stopped flowing through, send a slice or two of bread through the grinder to help push the last of the meat through...you don't want to waste an ounce...trust me.


handle the ground meat as little as possible.
as mentioned, DO NOT PACK YOUR PATTIES.  with all the trouble you've gone to extruding the meat, you don't want to wad this beautiful tender meat into a hard ball.
i used a biscuit cutter for a mold...lightly filled it and pressed it just enough for it to hold together.
salt and pepper the patties.


i am now a true believer in CAST IRON SKILLETS.
get it searing hot.  do not move the burger.  flip once.
again, as mentioned...remove from skillet before you think it's perfect.  it will cook considerably while resting.


i highly suggest topping with a square of SAINT AGUR CHEESE.  if you're not into bluesy cheeses, then a nice pat of butter will always suffice for that extra little unctuous trick.
let the burger rest at least 5 minutes.


choose your condiments wisely...
you do not want to interfere with the flavor and texture of this burger 
i feel like i created a burger from scratch...you will too.
i never even made it to the table

now say it with me...
"i will never buy pre-ground meat again !!!

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Cured Pork Belly Roasted with Apple, Onion and Brown Sugar


PORK BELLY WINS AGAIN.

i go to the Asian market every few weeks just to pick up some fresh tofu and some chili oil...maybe a few sweets for Dad from the bakery next door...

how does that darn pork belly jump into my shopping cart every single time ? !


mmmmm...the pork belly is succulent, the bacon is crispy, the onion and gala apple are caramelized in brown sugar and pork fatty goodness...
HOW DOES ONE RESIST ?
even the nay-sayers will bow to the pork belly...
it's very hard to ruin and it is so versatile.  so many ways to cook and so many ways to present.
you can't go wrong...


THE HEART ATTACK NAPOLEON ?
pork belly stacked with brown sugar-butter sauteed apple topped with caramelized onion.  i hear the sirens approaching.  
defibrillator...CLEAR !

the 1st one was a bit small and only had skin on half...so i covered it with bacon and it was crunchy, smoky, baconie, fatty and delicious

2nd time...bigger slab with more skin/fat, no need for bacon wrap.  i used more apples and brown sugar...yumm.  these apples remained in large enough pieces to serve with the belly.



CURED PORK BELLY ROASTED WITH APPLES ONION AND BROWN SUGAR

CURING THE BELLY
i suppose this could be done in a ziploc freezer bag, but i like to use a tupperware or glass/ceramic loaf pan so that the skin is not soaking in the cure...what ever will fit the piece of pork belly you have bought.

1/4 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup brown sugar
1-2 tsp fresh ground pepper

buy yourself a 2-3 lb. slab of belly with skin...no bones
i like to wash and dry it completely with paper towels before doing the cure.
completely cover the belly with the mixture.  place skin/fat side up in non-reactive container just big enough to fit. cover and let sit in fridge for at least 24 hours. this is the all important curing process. after about 12 hrs you can pour some of the liquid out of the container. i did. 

after 24 hrs remove and wash remaining salt/sugar mixture off under cool water. dry completely. take a sharp sharp knife and cut slits through the skin but not to the flesh. i cut about every 1/2  inch or so.
if skin is removed just put some shallow slashes into the fat.

COOKING THE PORK BELLY

1 large white onion
2 gala or honey crisp apples...something sweet and crisp
brown sugar
bacon, if the belly has no skin
cut 1 large white onion into thick slices and layer the bottom of a roasting pan lined with heavy tin foil.  put pork belly on the onions...this is sort of a trivet to keep the pork off the bottom of the roasting pan.  if you want to use the bacon method then remove the skin, not the fat, from the pork belly...(some are only sold without the skin) and cover the top with the bacon strips as shown in photo.  place apple slices nice and snug around as shown in photos.  this  prevents the sides from getting too brown AND lets the apples cook in pork fatty goodness.  sprinkle brown sugar all around the sides on and around apples.

there are 2 ways to cook the belly...low and slow for the whole time...or Jamie Oliver's method.  i suggest if you are using the bacon on top you do the low and slow method so the bacon won't burn.
NOTE...i did not get a crisp crunchy skin with either method.  i was not concerned because i knew i would be refrigerating this and consuming the next day.  the skin should crisp in the pan or broiler later.  if it doesn't want to crisp up, just discard the skin and sear the fatty side before serving.

Jamie Oliver method ....put oven to "full whack" 450 F for the first thirty minutes and then down to 350 F for the next 2 hours...or until really fork tender.  this is a fabulous recipe that you might want to start with if you are unfamiliar with pork belly....straight up crispy skin roasted pork belly...delicious!

Low and slow...put in 225 F degree oven for 5-6 hours or until meat is very fork tender.  this depends on the size of your belly (the PORK belly, silly).  remove from oven and let cool as is. when cool enough, put it in the fridge for at least a few hours. this makes for easy slicing and preparing and way you see fit... and you can keep it there for the week as you whittle away at the slab.  slice against the grain and sear in a hot pan...or put a large slice in the oven to warm and then turn your broiler on to crisp the skin.

do with it what you will...
you can't go wrong with a delicious slab of apple brown sugar pork belly.

Friday, May 4, 2012

Queso de Puerco...Pig's Head Cheese


QUESO de PUERCO...or...QUESOS de CABEZA
sounds a lot better than the translation...HEAD CHEESE

but wait...don't go...come back...
all this talk about nose to tail eating, waste not want not, being green and everything...you can't tell me you're gonna shy away from a little head cheese.
come on...be the adventurous foodie that you think you are...it's delicious!


i know the picture is a little alarming...
but you DO have to get over the shock factor that it IS all ingredients from a pig's head.  part by part it can be a little daunting...maybe disturbing for first timers, but nowhere near as disturbing as  tackling the whole head.
authentic Queso de Puerco is made from the WHOLE pig's head boiled and broken down...
I COULDN'T DO IT.  i'm not there yet...baby steps...besides it's a well known fact that a whole pig's head would not be allowed into this house.  i've snuck ears, tails and trotters in before, but i think the head with a face...eyes and teeth might just sign my walking papers.
SO...i had a better idea...
i simply bought all the parts.  a few ears, a couple of snouts, some trotters and a Pozole meat mixture (grab bag) which includes tongue, cheek, ears, lips, and various other bits of fatty meats that work well for this thing called head cheese.  i'll bet you didn't know that delicious authentic Pozole you love so much from your favorite Mexican restaurant actually had all those parts in it.  well, consider yourself christened.  
now come on...try the Queso de Puerco

this is nothing like the head cheese you're afraid of.  if you consider yourself an adventurous foodie this is a fabulous challenge to take "head on".
when presenting it to unsuspecting guests and those less adventurous, slip a few slices onto your next meat/charcuterie platter...call it a fancy "terrine"  or "Pate de Tete" if you have to..., but this one really is good ol' head cheese with some spicy Mexican flavors
...it will surely be the conversation at the table.


the left overs...i'm sure there will be some...make a delicious sandwich...or sear a slice or two in a hot skillet.  it renders into crispy little unctuous fatty bits that are delicious on top of a cold crisp salad.


QUESO de PUERCO...or HEAD CHEESE with Mexican flavors

things like this always change in flavors, size and shape...it depends on what parts of the pig you can get your hands on...AND are you willing to handle the said parts?... 
this is what i started with....

2-3 full pig ears
2 full trotters, sliced in half by the butcher
2 lbs. (or a little less) of Pozole mix...various pieces of pig including tongue, cheek, ear, snout, butt.
2 pig snouts...i found cooked, roasted snouts at the hot food area in my favorite Mexican market..Northgate, Santa Ana, CA
1 1/2 tsp cumin
1 big Tbsp dried oregano
1 tsp chipotle powder
1/2 tsp cayenne, optional
8-10 peppercorns
 1 large onion, quartered
3-4 bay leaves
6 smashed garlic cloves
2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
salt and fresh ground pepper

before you begin to cook, you need to take care of a couple things...
#1  you must look for any stray hairs that have made it past the first cut, so to speak.  check the ears, snout and trotters.  i find the easiest way is to burn them off with a lighter or even better, and more fun, use a kitchen torch...yes the one you use for creme brulee.
#2  i like to boil a big pot of water, big enough to hold everything and put all the meat in and boil the parts for about 5 minutes.  then remove, discard the water and clean the pot before using for the actual cooking.  this will take care of any lurking exterior impurities.

now...i could go on and on and get really involved with instructions, but really it "boils" down to this...

EVERYBODY IN THE POOL
all meats, veggies, herbs and spices into a pot big enough to hold it all.  cover with water,  water should just cover meats throughout the cooking process.
bring it to a boil, then to a nice simmer.  cook until all is fork tender.  approximately 3-4 hours.

again...trying to keep it simple...
remove meat and let cool to the touch.  remove bones, large fat and any unwanted parts...NO don't toss it all...that was a joke!
strain broth through cheesecloth.  taste broth.  it should taste quite over seasoned, so add more salt and spice if necessary.
pack meats into a large loaf pan lined with Saran wrap.  i like it well packed.  pour warm broth over and weigh some sort of lid down on top so as to press everything together packed tightly.  you will be pressing out most of the liquid so do this in the sink.  the more packed it is...the less gelatinous your block of head cheese will be.
refrigerate for a few hours.  it's ready when it is solid.

slice and enjoy with pride.
now you are a true nose to tail-er
or...snout to trotter...er


PS...if you truly want to attempt this and need more instruction, i would be more than happy to answer any questions.
here are a few other terrines i have posted about that pretty much use the same method.
once you have made one terrine you can make anything into a terrine.
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